Sequoia Sempervirens Superlative Trees

Trees with the Thickest Bark in the World

Following are the trees with the thickest bark in the world

Species and Family Where native? Greatest thickness or depth.
Giant Sequoia, or Big Tree. (Sequoiadendron giganteum) Taxodiaceae. Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. The greatest thickness which has been reliably measured is 2.5 feet (76.2 cm) for one in Redwood Canyon, Kings Canyon National Park.
Coast Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) Taxodiaceae. Coastal Northern and Central California and extreme southern Oregon. The “Mill Creek Giant” near the Mill Creek bridge in Redwood National Park, Crescent City, California has bark eighteen inches (45.7 centimeters) thick.
Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) (Pinaceae) Northwestern North America. A tree felled in North Vancouver, British Columbia in 1902 had bark 13.5 inches (34.3 centimeters) in thickness.
Cork Oak (Quercus suber) Fagaceae circum-Mediterranean distribution. One Cork Oak at the chapel of Sao Goncalo ten miles (16 kilometers) south of Lisbon, Portugal had cork measuring eight inches (20 cm) deep.
Bangalay (Eucalyptus botryoides) Myrtaceae. Victoria and New South Wales, Australia. In 1973, one Bangalay in Alameda Park, Santa Barbara, California had bark fissured to a depth of seven inches (17.8 cm) with again an unknown depth of unfissured bark below that.
Parana Pine (Araucaria angustifolia) Araucariaceae. Mostly in southernmost Brazil. Bark can be over six inches (“more than 15 centimeters”) thick.
Renala (Adansonia grandidieri) Bombacaceae. Madagascar. Bark is up to six inches (fifteen centimeters) thick.
Valley Oak (Quercus lobata) Fagaceae. Central Valley of California southward to the San Gabriel Valley. This bark also up to six inches (i5 cm) in thickness.
Nolina longifolia Agavaceae Mexico One plant at the Huntington Library, Galleries and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, California in 1996 had bark with fissures up to 4.75 inches ( 12.1 centimeters) deep.